Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 13th International Conference on Structural and Molecular Biology: Techniques & Market Analysis Ottawa | Ontario | Canada.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Chien Ho

Carnegie Mellon University

Keynote: A New Picture of Hemoglobin Allostery
Conference Series Structural and Molecular Biology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Chien Ho photo
Biography:

Chien Ho is an Alumni Professor of Biological Sciences, Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). He earned a PhD from Yale University and completed his postdoctoral training in the Departments of Chemistry and Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A former recipient of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute MERIT Award, Dr. Ho is an Academician of Academia Sinica and actively involved in research efforts rooted in understanding the relationship between structure and function in biological systems. This is made possible by correlating information obtained from biochemical, biophysical, and molecular biological techniques. In 2013, he was named a Fellow of the International Society for the Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and also received its Gold Medal Award for his contributions to the development of in-vivo tracking of immune cells by MRI.

Abstract:

Since the crystal structures of hemoglobin (Hb) in both unliganded (T) and liganded (R) forms were determined in 1970s by Perutz and co-workers, its cooperative oxygenation process has been used as a model for allosteric protein interactions, namely based on a two-structure concerted allosteric model.  In spite of extensive studies of this protein molecule by numerous investigators during the past 48 years, the molecular basis for its physiological functions is not fully understood.  An evolving picture of Hb allostery from the classical two-structure model is being developed through the results obtained from multi-nuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and genetic engineering techniques of the Hb molecule.  These new results show that the structures of hemoglobin in solution are different from those in crystals and are a dynamic ensemble of multiple structures.  Protein dynamics plays an important role in regulating both the structure and function of a protein molecule.  The implications of these new results to the structure-dynamic-function relationship of hemoglobin will be discussed.

 

Keynote Forum

Yuri L. Lyubchenko

University of Nebraska Medical Center

Keynote: Nano-assembly of Amyloid β peptide: Role of the Hairpin Fold

Time : 09:40

Conference Series Structural and Molecular Biology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yuri L. Lyubchenko photo
Biography:

Yuri L. Lyubchenko is Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA. His research focuses on understanding fundamental mechanisms underlying health and disease, which are key to developing new and more effective diagnostics and medications. This primarily basic research allows him not only identify new drug targets for small molecule drugs, it also leads to development of the nanotools and methods to discover novel approaches for diagnostic, treatment and disease prevention and to more rapidly determine their efficacy at the molecular level.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem Increasing evidence suggests that the self-assembly of amyloid bb protein underlies the early onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Given that small bnanoassemblies (oligomers) are the most neurotoxic species, they have become the major target for the development of treatments and early diagnostic tools for AD. However, advances surrounding this are blocked by the lack of structure intrinsic to  oligomers, as they are transient states of b aggregation kinetics; making traditional structural approaches non-amenable. We have previously developed single-molecule approaches capable of probing of a dimers.  Here we extended our approaches to higher order oligomers. We hypothesized that the folding pattern of amyloid protein defines the aggregation pathway.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: In this study, we tested this hypothesis using Aβ(14-23) peptide in linear form and its tandem assembled in the hairpin-type shape. We combined two experimental approaches and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize molecular interactions and the stability of complexes between Ab(14-23) hairpin and Ab(14-23) monomer, as well as the interactions between two hairpins. Findings: The lifetime measurements demonstrate that the Ab(14-23) hairpin and a Ab(14-23) monomer assemble in a very stable complex when compared with homologous ensembles. We measured the strength of hairpin-hairpin and hairpin-monomer interactions which demonstrated that the hairpin-monomer interaction is stronger compared with the hairpin-hairpin assembly; data that is fully in line with the lifetime measurements. Aggregation studies demonstrate that the Ab(14-23) monomer formed fibrils and the hairpin formed spherical structures. However, their mixture formed neither fibrils nor spherical structures, but rather disk-shaped nanostructures.

Conclusion & Significance: Overall, our study provides new insight into the role of the monomer structure on the self-assembly process that contributes to the formation of disease aggregates. Importantly, the developed experimental approaches and validation approaches for computational analyses are not limited to amyloid proteins, but can also be applied to other molecular systems.  

Conference Series Structural and Molecular Biology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Henry M. Sobell photo
Biography:

Henry M. Sobell completed his studies at Brooklyn Technical High School (1948-1952), Columbia College (1952-1956), and the University of Virginia School of Medicine (1956-1960). Instead of practicing clinical medicine, he then went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to join Professor Alexander Rich in the Department of Biology (1960-1965), where, as a Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellow, he learned the technique of single crystal X-ray analysis. He then joined the Chemistry Department at the University of Rochester, having been subsequently jointly appointed to both the Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics departments (the latter at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry), becoming a full tenured Professor in both departments (1965-1993). He is now retired and living in the Adirondacks in New York, USA.

Abstract:

Premeltons are examples of emergent structures (i.e., structural solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally nontopological, undergo breather motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A- DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather-motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A- transition), which differs from either A- or B- DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible – and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer-backbone combined with the partial-unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A- DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical-chemistry and molecular-biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5’ and 3’ ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries within it a number of experimental predictions – all readily testable – as will be described in my talk.

  • Structural and Molecular Biology
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

I shall present a conceptually different approach to the long-standing problem of crystallization of integral membrane proteins. This approach is based on the idea that nucleation and growth of high quality membrane protein (MP) crystals, permitting structure determination at atomic resolution, can be promoted by means of a detergent-micelle conjugation mechanism to bring the protein detergent complexes (PDCs) into proximity.  The interactions which produce conjugation must: (a) be highly specific, mild and non-covalent; (b) be sufficiently general to apply to membrane proteins regardless of their biological origin; and (c) be straightforward to implement in practice. These criteria are satisfied by a novel type of micelle that we have termed: Engineered-micelles.

Engineered-micelles contain, in addition to the common surfactant, unique amphiphiles which interact to form conjugated micellar aggregates. We have constructed engineered-micelles based on three types of conjugation mechanisms: (i) hydrophobic [metal:chelator] complexes; (ii) the complementarity of hydrophobic nucleoside base-pairs; or (iii) hydrophobic +/- charged peptides. We have included these conjugating species in a variety of non-ionic detergent micelles, widely used in the crystallization of membrane proteins (e.g. OG, DM, DDM, C8E4). We found that, under the gentle conditions of our crystallization trials, growth of membrane protein crystals was indeed observed only in the presence of conjugated engineered-micelles. 

I shall also discuss extension of the conjugation concept towards a more flexible mechanism that would not only bring PDCs into proximity via specific means, but, a priori, would permit a level of control over the inter-micellar distances. With the possibility of  shorteningelongation of the conjugating molecules, the PDCs would then be positioned at distances that could take into account the size of the detergent micelles as well as the size of the hydrophilic domains of the integral MP. 

Speaker
Biography:

Rehab Mohammed Atta ElDesoukey the World Academic Championship-2017 in Microbiology (Veterinary Medicine). IASR recognizes Dr. Rehab Mohamed Atta Mahmoud El-Desoukey among World's 500 Most Influential Experts in Microbiology for the Year 2017 on Earth according to International Agency for Standards and Ratings. She graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt, in 1997, earned a Master's in microbiology and immunology in 2004 and Doctorate completed in 2009 working as a researcher of Microbiology and Immunology at the National Research Center in Egypt, where she includes a selection of the greatest scientists and inventors in Egypt is also working as an assistant professor at Shaqraa university , Saudi Arabia .she is active ,has personal love of reading and explore everything new has conducted many researches in the field of microbiology, that are looking for antimicrobials in everything new and strange plants and herbs.

 

Abstract:

Cosmetic products support microbial growth due to the presence of variable amounts of nutrients. The most bacterial contaminants that were found in cosmetic products Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Achromobacter and Alcaligenes. Mostly due to contaminated water. So this study aimed to determine and compare between the microbial contamination of traditional products such as Athmad (kohl), Henna (Lawsonia inermis), (Ocimum), Sedr (Rhamnus), Musk, Derum (Juglan regia L.), Mshat (Alcea) and Magic rouge in addition to modern cosmetic products from cheap and valuable trade mark such as Mascara, Eyeliner, Rouge, Plusher, Face powder and Foundation in two different states of use (intact and in-use). In this study, 67 traditional and modern cosmetic products analyzed microbiologically, the result revealed that Salmonella was the predominant isolates from intact and used collected samples with an equal incidence 76% equal to the incidence of Staph. epidermis from used samples followed by Staph. epidermis with an incidence of 57% from intact isolates while the incidences of Staph aureus were 43% and 16% from intact and used samples respectively. Among intact and used samples E. coli was isolated from only 2 samples with low incidence 0.02% and 0.04% respectively. The incidence of microbial contamination was higher in modern cosmetics than traditional cosmetics especially in Athmed (kohl) samples, also microbial contamination was high in incidence in mascara, plusher and eye shadow as modern cosmetics , so it could be concluded that cosmetic products produced in Riyadh , can be contami nated during the production process and they can serve as vehicles for the transmission of these pathogenic organisms . Therefore it is important to take precautions during production process in order to pre vent infections due to microbial contamination.

Speaker
Biography:

I have done M.Sc. in Molecular biology and Biochemistry from Guru Nanak dev University Amritsar, Punjab, India. CurrentyI am a Ph.D. research scholar in the school of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India. My Ph.D. work is to study spectral perturbations in GFP in non-aqueous environment. 

Abstract:

Wild type Green Fluorescent Protein (Wt-GFP) exhibits two absorption peaks corresponding to neutral (A) and anionic (B) forms of the chromophore. The ratio of the peaks is found sensitive to organic solvent addition in a similar manner as observed for pH titration. There exits an active proton wire between the chromophore hydroxyl and Glu222 residue via water and Ser205 molecules. The same wire is inactive in S65T mutants. Organic solvent based spectral shift is limited to Ser65-Glu222 proteins only. It is speculated that organic solvents are perturbing the protonation-deprotonation equilibrium. To find the mechanism by which organic solvents are bringing this shift His148 and Thr203 positions are targeted for directed mutagenesis. Various mutants have been studied in the presence of organic solvents using absorbance/fluorescence spectroscopy. To see the effect on excited state dynamics femtosecond/picosecond time resolved fluorescence study has been done. On the basis of which it is proposed that organic solvent based spectral transition is a ground state process which needs an active Ser65-Glu222 proton wire along with the anionic form stabilising residues at 203 and 148 positions.

Speaker
Biography:

Vahid jajarmi has completed his PhD at (2014) in Science and Research branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran-Iran. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals (EN-FARSI). He is faculty member and the head of young researcher and elite club in Islamic Azad University, Bojnord Brunch. 2000 -2018: Teaching agriculture design, statistical, plant breeding, genetics.

Abstract:

Iran is located in dry and semi dry region. In this condition, producing forage in land race is very important. The presence of endophyte fungi in a plant leads to resistance to a range of biotic and a biotic stresses. Plant growth gets better by producing a range of different types of metabolites by fungal endophytic. Fungal endophytes produce a range of alkaloids such as lolin, peramin, ergowalin, and lolitrum that protect the host (plant) against insects.  They belong to genus Epchloe (Clavipitaceae), which reside in the leaf sheath of many cool-season grass families of poaceae such as  Lolium perenne. In this study, more than 60 fresh plant materials (Natural samples) of Lolium perenne, were collected from the native rangelands in north of Iran (Golestan state). To insure the presence of fungai endophyte in the fresh samples, leaf sheaths were stained with Rose Bengal. The genomic DNA was also extracted from the isolates to confirm the identity of fungi by ISSR marker. The results of the present study showed that the endophyte fungi belonged to Neotyphodium. In 2015, a field experiment design was carried out in split- plot based on randomized complete block in Research farm Bojnord Azad university. The main factor(A) were: normal irrigation (65 mm evaporation), moderate stress (irrigation after 95 mm evaporation) and high stress (irrigation after 115 mm evaporation),factor (B) were included: lolium prenne infected by endophyte and  lolium prenne free endophyte.  The stress conditions reduced all traits and this reduction was significantly lower in endophyte-infected genotypes. In other words, under the stress condition, endophyte-infected samples had higher physiological characteristics such as: leaf area index, crop growth rate, CGR, Spad chlorophyll, tillers number, dry weight, crown, leaf length and wet weight. The most protein and leaf proline and carotenoid and chlorophyll ratio a/b belonged to lolium prenne infected by endophyte in moderate stress. Glucose and Fructose are produced in symbiotic plants more than free fungi. Endophytic fungi stimulate secondary metabolites in response to drought tolerance such as: loline alkaloid. It can be concluded that the endophytes in normal and stress conditions can help increase the traits effective on physiological characteristics. Under nutrient-limited conditions, endophyte decreases the metabolic cost on the host grass.   

Moyeen Bakar

Hammersmith Medicines Research Ltd, United Kingdom

Title: Antimicrobial activity of natural products
Speaker
Biography:

Moyeen Bakar has completed his undergraduate majors in Pharmaceutical Science to find how the drugs are discovered, developed and manufactured. His research was “Antimicrobial Activity of Natural Products”. He has completed masters in Pharmacology to research on how the drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized and eliminated in human body. His research interest is to develop a new drug that can combat antimicrobial resistance in human body. The antibiotic that exists is not combating the bacteria at present, he has been working to gain national and international experience on research and clinical trials. His ultimate ambitions is to do research on cancer drugs, which could prevent even forming the cancer tissue. He has also researched on the effects of pyruvate on control and diabetic soleus muscle. His another research is Alzheimer’s Disease, which can be possible type 3 diabetes.

Abstract:

Antimicrobial agents are classified according to the spectrum of their action. They have many roles by acting as antifungal, antiviral and antiprotozoal action. They also have essential functions i.e. inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, nucleic acid synthesis and many more. Medicinal plants are significantly useful and economical. Antimicrobial agents are essentially important in reducing the global burden of infectious diseases. With the irrational and excessive use of antibiotics in underdeveloped and developing countries, there may be chances to develop and spread resistant pathogens in the community. Therefore, the need for novel alternative antimicrobial strategies has renewed interest in natural products like turmeric, honey, ginger and others exhibiting antibacterial properties. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is emerging at an alarming rate as mortality due to resistant pathogens. Since AMR is against all clinically utilized antibiotics, finding novel antimicrobials with unexploited targets remains the main goal worldwide. The research is to determine the natural product has the best antimicrobial activity by looking at various fruits, plants and other natural resources. The project was a latest literature based to find the best antibacterial activity and therefore the existing research journals were used. This indicates a range of antimicrobial activity of natural products against pathogens. Of the raw natural products, garlic juice had the highest activity. The most active processed products were peppermint oil and the four pure compounds trans‐cinnamaldehyde, allicin, menthol and zingerone. Bacteroides species has similar susceptibility to C. difficile to most natural products; Lactobacillus casei was less susceptible. It is worthy to consider honey as a promising future antimicrobial to be tested and studied. Honey, may be elaborately used in future with some more molecular studies on its method of action as an antimicrobial agent. Our efforts now focus on purifying these compounds, elucidate their structures and study their mode of action.

Speaker
Biography:

CEO and Founder of Biotechnology and Regenerative Medicine at RegenerAge International ™,Vice President of International Clinical Development for Bioquark, Inc. and Chief Clinical Officer at ReAnima™ Advanced Biosciences. Advance Fellow by the American Board of Anti-Aging and Regenerative
Medicine (A4M), Visiting Scholar at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Dermatology). Fellow in Stem Cell Medicine by the American Academy of Anti Aging Medicine and University of South Florida.

Abstract:

As it has been previously demonstrated that coelectroporation of Xenopus laevis frog oocytes with
normal cells and cancerous cell lines induces the expression of pluripotency markers and in
experimental murine model studies that mRNA extract (Bioquantine®) purified from intra and
extra-oocyte liquid phases of electroporated oocytes) showed potential as a treatment for a wide
range of conditions, including Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) among others. The current study observed
beneficial changes with Bioquantine® administration in a patient with a severe SCI. Pluripotent
stem cells have therapeutic and regenerative potential in clinical situations CNS disorders even
cancer. One method of reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells is to expose them to extracts prepared from Xenopus laevis oocytes. The positive human findings for spinal cord injury with the results from previous animal studies with experimental models of traumatic brain injury
and SCI respectively as our evidence and due to ethical reasons, legal restrictions and a limited number of patients, we were able to treat only a very small number of patients, deciding to include in our protocol the RestoreSensor SureScan to complete it.Based on the electrical stimulation for rehabilitation and regeneration after spinal cord injury published by Hamid and MacEwan, we designed an improved delivery method for the in-situ application of MSCs and Bioquantine® in combination with the RestoreSensor® SureScan®. To the present day the patient who suffered a complete section of spinal cord at T12-L1 shows an improvement in sensitivity, strength in striated muscle and smooth muscle connection, 13 months after the first treatment and 6 months after the placement of RestoreSensor® at the level of the lesion, showing an evident improvement on his therapy of physical rehabilitation (legs movement) on crawling forward and backwards and standing on his feet for the first time and showing a progressively important functionality on both limbs.

  • Structural Biology in Cancer Research
Speaker
Biography:

Prakash Kinthada is a Professor in Chemistry at Sri Vidyanikethan Engineering college, JNTU University in Ananthapur, A. Rangam Peta, Tirupathi, India.

 

Abstract:

Cancer is a dreadful disease and any practical solution in combating this disease is of paramount importance to public health. Cancer patients have burdened by drug induced toxic side effects, and no turned to seek help from the complementary and alternative medicine hoping for a better cure. Research on Platinum based drugs and Non Platinum based drugs is a Multi-Million Dollar Industry in USA and there is every need to produce safe drugs for the cure of this monstrous disease. Flavonoids have a long history of use in traditional medicines in many cultures. The phytochemical, curcumin is one of the major dietary flavonoid, belonging to a group of flavonol, Curcumin is a natural polyphenol. It is highly potential molecule capable of preventing and treating various cancers.  Various dietary chemo preventive agents, turmeric powder or its extract are broadly used as therapeutic preparations in Indian System of medicine. We provide a summarized synthesis and structural determination of Curcumin Oxime, Curcumin Thiosemicarbazone derivative of Gold (III) complex. The use of these analogs for prevention of cancer tumor progression and treatments of human malignancies. A pharmacologic agent for treating and/or preventing cancer, among other diseases and conditions, and particularly breast, prostate, and pancreatic cancer, in humans and animals. The novel pharmacologic agent is an isoflavonoid or isoflavonoid mimetic covalently attached to a cytotoxic pharmacophore that, preferably has the ability to conjugate with a metal salt to form a more potent metal complex, particularly a Au (III) complex and other complexes of Platinum, Palladium, Ruthenium, Copper etc.

My talk would mainly encompass different Transition Metal Complexes/Organometallic Compounds   that are presently used as drugs, especially Anticancer and Anti-HIV drugs, apart from Anti-inflammatory, Antimicrobial, Antibacterial and diseases like Arthritis and Parkinson’s Disease etc. The talk would mainly focus on the use of Medicinal Chemistry and it’s application to Drug Design and Development in Pharmaceutical Industry ,  especially    Transition Metal Complexes and Organometallic Compounds viz. Gold, Platinum, Palladium And Ruthenium apart from Copper, Cobalt, Iron,  Nickel, Zinc, Cadmium etc.

Speaker
Biography:

Sajid Rashid received his Ph.D. in Functional Genomics from George-August University, Germany in Jan. 2006. He worked in International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Warsaw, Poland as a Postdoc Researcher from 2006-2009. Currently, he is the Chairperson of National Center for Bioinformatics at Quaid-e-Azam University Islamabad, Pakistan. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals. His main focus is to identify novel protein complexes and pathways involved in cancerogenesis. In parallel to protein interaction studies, he characterizes novel drug targets computationally.

Abstract:

The current interest in the identification and characterization of βTrCP1 substrates necessitates a promising approach with broad structural constraints of WD40 potential binding sites. Here, we employed an in silico integrative approach to identify putative novel substrates of βTrCP1. Through a screened degradation motif (DSGXXS) for the entire human proteome and comparative substrate binding analysis of βTrCP1, we identified 344 substrates, sharing high sequence similarity with the consensus motif. Subsequent filtering on the basis of functional annotation and clustering resulted in the isolation of hits having clear roles in various cancer types. These substrates were phosphorylated at the Ser residues (Ser14 and Ser18) of the conserved motif. A comprehensive and thorough analysis of βTrCP1–phosphopeptide association indicated residual contributions located at the upper face of the b-propeller. Evidently, upon binding to phosphopeptides, the central channel of βTrCP1 attains a more open conformation to assist substrate binding. To elaborate the oncogenic function of βTrCP1, the SKP1–βTrCP1–CDH6 ternary complex was docked against CUL1–RBX1 and the acquired model exactly resembled the previously characterized SKP1–βTrCP1–β-catenin model. Overall, a deeper understanding of substrate targeting mechanisms coupled with the structural knowledge of βTrCP1 and associated proteins will be useful for designing novel targets for cancer therapeutics.

Speaker
Biography:

Sajid Rashid received his Ph.D. in Functional Genomics from George-August University, Germany in Jan. 2006. He worked in International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Warsaw, Poland as a Postdoc Researcher from 2006-2009. Currently, he is the Chairperson of National Center for Bioinformatics at Quaid-e-Azam University Islamabad, Pakistan. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals. His main focus is to identify novel protein complexes and pathways involved in cancerogenesis. In parallel to protein interaction studies, he characterizes novel drug targets computationally.

Abstract:

The current interest in the identification and characterization of βTrCP1 substrates necessitates a promising approach with broad structural constraints of WD40 potential binding sites. Here, we employed an in silico integrative approach to identify putative novel substrates of βTrCP1. Through a screened degradation motif (DSGXXS) for the entire human proteome and comparative substrate binding analysis of βTrCP1, we identified 344 substrates, sharing high sequence similarity with the consensus motif. Subsequent filtering on the basis of functional annotation and clustering resulted in the isolation of hits having clear roles in various cancer types. These substrates were phosphorylated at the Ser residues (Ser14 and Ser18) of the conserved motif. A comprehensive and thorough analysis of βTrCP1–phosphopeptide association indicated residual contributions located at the upper face of the b-propeller. Evidently, upon binding to phosphopeptides, the central channel of βTrCP1 attains a more open conformation to assist substrate binding. To elaborate the oncogenic function of βTrCP1, the SKP1–βTrCP1–CDH6 ternary complex was docked against CUL1–RBX1 and the acquired model exactly resembled the previously characterized SKP1–βTrCP1–β-catenin model. Overall, a deeper understanding of substrate targeting mechanisms coupled with the structural knowledge of βTrCP1 and associated proteins will be useful for designing novel targets for cancer therapeutics.

  • Structural Biology and Bioinformatics
Speaker
Biography:

Akinloye graduated from the Department of Biochemistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria in 1991 with a First – Class Honors Division. He had Master of Science (M.Sc) in Biochemistry from the same University in 1997. He obtained a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in Biochemistry in January 2008 from the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. He is actively involved in the teaching and supervision of Biochemistry students at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and also carrying out researches with bias in the area of Phytomedicine/Enzymology.

Akinloye has been an External Examiner (undergraduate and Postgraduate) in many Universities both within and outside Nigeria. He has held both academic and administrative leadership positions at the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, coupled with being academic resource person to some neighboring Universities.  He  attended several conferences within and outside Nigeria. He has published over seventy (70) scientific articles in reputable journals and many refereed conference proceedings. He is presently a Professor of Biochemistry and Phytomedicine, as well as the Dean, College of Biosciences, at the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta.

Abstract:

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) competitively inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs). In addition to the outstanding anti-inflammatory potential of the NSAIDs, the associated side effects of the current NSAIDs have limited their therapeutic benefits. The therapeutic mechanism of action of NSAIDs is through the inhibition of COX-2 and COX-1, however, side effects of NSAIDs arise from the inhibition of COX-1. Hence, the need to search for novel compounds (phytochemicals) that can selectively inhibit COX-2. In the present study, Virtual High Throughput Screening techniques were employed to screen eight hundred and fifty (850) phyochemiclals from seventeen medicinal plants, the lead phytochemicals (Citrostadienol from Nicotiana tabacum and Eriodictyol from Sorghum bicolor, with binding energies of -10.9 kcal/mol and -11.1 kcal/mol respectively) that selectively inhibit COX-2 were selected. The pharmacological kinetic analyses of the lead phytochemicals were determined. Moreover, Citrostadienol and Eriodictyol down-regulated the expressions of pro-anti-inflammatory cytokines genes (TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2 and CRP) in HCl/ethanol induced inflammation in male Wistar rats. In-vivo biochemical assays carried out also give credence to the anti-inflammatory potentials of the lead compounds.

Speaker
Biography:

I am Sana Munquad working in the Department of Mathematics, Bioinformatics and Computer Applications, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India.

Abstract:

Phylogenetic analysis of genomic sequences of plant species of can reveal crucial information and knowledge for understanding Evolutionary relationship, functions and interactions of their sequences. The traditional methods of drawing phylogenetic tree different tools are available. The sequences data belongs to the same group have similar characters, by which results are concluded. Here an attempt has been made to find out a similar plant species which belong to the same group on the basis of their genomic sequences have same characteristics. 110 sequences of plant species are downloaded from NCBI and screened for redundancy to obtain non redundant sequences. The level k network is applied among the sequence data and the most appropriate cluster groups are developed. Using their genomic sequence find out their divergence time and also find the conserved regions among the plant species like Secale cereal, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare and Zea mays and their subspecies. The genomic sequence data are explored and analysed using phylogenetic analysis approach.